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Gallery 01 - Main St.


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Gallery 02 - Main St. Postcards


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Gallery 03 - Willimantic


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Gallery 04 - Willi Spots


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Gallery 05 - Footbridge


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Gallery 06 - Postcard Series


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Gallery 07 - Businesses - Pre 1930


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Gallery 08 - Businesses - Post 1930


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Gallery 09 - Early Scenes


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Gallery 10 - Buildings


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Gallery 11 - Churches - Religious


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57 albums on 5 page(s) 1

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Filename=4007.JPG Filesize=317KB Dimensions=1738x1611 Date added=Nov 26, 2015
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Filename=people-tc-2.jpg Filesize=74KB Dimensions=634x480 Date added=Apr 23, 2012
President Roosevelt visits Willimantic (2)
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Filename=pow-06-28-12.jpg Filesize=221KB Dimensions=720x440 Date added=Jun 28, 2012
Rev. Francis Mulville's FuneralPic of the Week - June 28, 2012
Father Francis X. Mulville was extremely community oriented and was a member of several organizations and groups. They included the Knights of Columbus, the Montgomery Hose Company and the Willimantic Gun Club. As evidenced by the picture postcard, a large group gathered at the Willimantic Train Station. At Willimantic, the officers of the Montgomery Hose Company boarded the train and accompanied the body, "to its last resting place at Simsbury".

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Filename=pice3.jpg Filesize=169KB Dimensions=928x1024 Date added=Feb 26, 2010
Chapman BlockChapman Block 1962
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Filename=sl5.jpg Filesize=785KB Dimensions=1515x1040 Date added=Oct 25, 2013
The Commercial Block and the Turner BuildingThe Commercial Block (661-677 Main St.) and the Turner Building (679-685 Main St.) were destroyed in the Saint Valentine’s Day fire of 1968. At the time the photo was taken, the buildings were occupied by the Grand Union Tea Company, Towne Photographers, Bowman’s Tailor Shop, Yonclas Confectionary, Danahey’s Barber Shop, Dondero’s Pool Room, Hunt’s Clothing Store and Giles Hardware. Pic of the Week for October 17, 2013.
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Filename=3-2-2017-pow.jpg Filesize=191KB Dimensions=1314x1013 Date added=Mar 02, 2017
Bay State PharmacyThe Bay State Pharmacy originally opened in the Loomer Opera House. It then moved to the new Nathan Hale Hotel (where this photo was taken). In 1967, the pharmacy closed and was replaced by a cocktail lounge.
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Filename=May20.jpg Filesize=104KB Dimensions=1024x552 Date added=May 20, 2011
Adams and Company Meat MarketPic of the Week - May 20, 2011
In this pic, we'll start with the building at the very left of the picture. That is 931 Main St. and was once known as "the Gelinas Block" and then "the Mazzola Block". The middle building (with the Eagle Ale sign) is the saloon of Arthur McQuillan. McQuillans was a popular spot. Notice that the sign actually spells his name wrong. While it was "McQuillan in newspaper ads and the city directory, the sign says "McQuillian" - with an extra "i". Maybe it was painted by a patron who had one too many. The building on the right of McQuillan's (the two story house with a business on the street level) was 921-927 Main St. with "S. Adams and Co. Meat Market" at 921. Today it is the site of the Willimantic Public Library. Determining street numbers of past buildings is not always an exact science when applying them to today's buildings. The Library today is listed at 905 Main. Many of the buildings in earlier years consisted of 2 or more addresses depending upon how many floors a building had. But we'll happily accept any corrections

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Filename=renewal-12.jpg Filesize=65KB Dimensions=1024x583 Date added=Jun 04, 2011
Double storefront On the left is the building that had a double storefront and was home to the Jehovah’s Witnesses and the First Society of Spiritualists. On the right is the Park Central. These two buildings as well as one on the right of the Park central were built around 1890 by M. Eugene Lincoln (not the Lincoln Square Lincoln) who was one of the city's most prolific builders. Besides these three, he put up at least ten other buildings in the city.