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Filename=pic6.jpg Filesize=127KB Dimensions=663x1024 Date added=Feb 26, 2010
Willimantic Linen Company's Number Three MillThis 1910 postcard depicts the Willimantic Linen Company's Number Three Mill. It was erected in 1845 by the Wellesville Company on the site of Willimantic's first cotton mill built by Perez Richmond in 1822. The Wellesville mill became part of the Linen Company in 1876. It was demolished in the late 1920s, and stood on the city's Recreation Park. This idyllic view depicts the mill raceway and provides a somewhat over romantic view of industrialization, in a style known as "the factory in the garden."
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Filename=pic7.jpg Filesize=92KB Dimensions=629x1024 Date added=Feb 26, 2010
Tinker Ted's Taxi ServiceThe Marrotte family purchased a summer home on Lake Coventry in the 1920s. Ice fishing was a favorite winter pastime. Marrotte (right) and his father-in-law Arman Trudeau dsiplay their catches, circa 1925.
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Filename=pic03.jpg Filesize=166KB Dimensions=1024x650 Date added=Jan 23, 2011
Stone arch bridge in 1920A trolley car crosses the stone arch bridge in 1920, revealing the need for a new highway bridge - a bridge that would not be built until more than 60 years after the demise of the trolley cars.
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Filename=1-7-2016-pow.jpg Filesize=309KB Dimensions=2047x1025 Date added=Jan 07, 2016
Pic of the Week January 7, 2015From the 1920s until the early 40s, marching bands and dance bands provided much of the music for all types of Willimantic events. The “Al-Pierre Tabarin” on Valley Street was one of Eastern Connecticut’s premier dance spots. Hal White had studied at the Boston Conservatory of Music and put this band together in the early 1930s. Local musicians included Kerman Lavigne (tenor sax), Clarence Sylvester (banjo), Bill and Ray Buckingham (trumpets), Roy Grover (drums),Lester Carter (piano), Rodney Clune (alto sax), and Hal White (violin and sax).
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Filename=pow - 01-31-2013.jpg Filesize=345KB Dimensions=1024x745 Date added=Jan 31, 2013
Clubhouse of the Nipnet Canoe ClubPic of the Week - January 31, 2013. Nipnet Canoe Club. The clubhouse was built on the south side of the Willimantic River about a quarter mile from the Quidnick-Windham Mfg. Company’s dam and was later doubled in size. It was destroyed by fire in the early 1930s. The club was active in Willimantic, especially in the early 1920s.
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Filename=pic4.jpg Filesize=105KB Dimensions=1024x651 Date added=Jun 03, 2010
Dr. Mason's HospitalThis picture is of Dr. Mason's Hospital at Fairview Avenue in 1920. It was built in 1880 as a home by William Barrows, the president of the Willimantic Linen Company. The rambling mansion was purchased circa 1908 by Dr. Louis Irving Mason (1865-1930), and in 1911 he built the extension on the rear. In 1939 it became the home of the Spector family, and also the site of summer theatre, thus laying the roots of the Windham Theatre Guild. The magnificent building was demolished in 1979.
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Filename=4-1920app.jpg Filesize=159KB Dimensions=1024x654 Date added=Jun 17, 2011
Main St. - EastApp. 1920
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Filename=January15.jpg Filesize=190KB Dimensions=1024x586 Date added=Jan 15, 2011
ScotlandPic of the Week - January 15, 2010The picture is of the Scotland, CT town green. The camera is facing East. I apologize for being a bit inaccurate in saying that the Green hasn't changed much in a hundred years. The large building in the almost center of the picture is no longer there. I actually had to look at the picture several times before realizing that something didn't seem to agree with the present makeup of the Green.
Clay and I appreciate all comments about any of our Pics of the Week. This week, I thought it was interesting that possibilities included Columbia and Hampton. So many town Greens are basically the same - with a church and/or other meeting house, a Town Hall and some public building (such as a hotel) for housing. I've included the following excerpt from "www.towngreens.com".

"The Green and its streetscape accurately reflect the development of Scotland since it was established, including the contemporary St. Margaret's Church sited next to the staid Congregational Church and Chapel. This is one of the charms of the town center, as is the c. 1920 bungalow tucked between the town hall and dwelling built during the Colonial period. However, the green can only support a certain amount of change before it loses its character. This is already happening due to some unsympathetic remodeling/conversions. There is also a large empty lot facing the green where a hotel once stood that will some day be developed.
In addition, there is some local concern that the Department of Transportation has plans to modify the sight lines in order to improve traffic safety which could adversely affect the green.

Most likely a town center began to develop when Scotland was allowed to build a pound for its livestock and a school for the children. It was not until 1727 when perhaps as many as 80 families were living in the area that Scotland was granted winter privileges. Finally, in 1732, a separate ecclesiastical society was established and according to Bayles, the place for the meetinghouse was established on a knoll on the east side of Merricks Brook and the south side of the road from Windham to Canterbury. Nathanial Huntington deeded .25 acre to the Society and in November 1733 the first meeting was held in the meetinghouse that was constructed on the present Scotland green.
In 1772, a new meetinghouse was built on the site of the present Congregational Church (1842) and the original meetinghouse was removed from the green. Concern was voiced in 1774 that the school house, so close to the meetinghouse, could endanger it should there be a fire. As a result, the school house was moved a suitable distance away.... The Scotland Green was established as a site for the meetinghouse when the Ecclesiastical Society was created in 1732. It was then and is now the heart of the community around which the important civic, religious and commercial buildings have always been located."
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8-21-14pow.jpg
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Filename=8-21-14pow.jpg Filesize=250KB Dimensions=1321x884 Date added=Aug 21, 2014
The 1920 Willimantic Auto ShowThis was one of the exhibits at Willimantic’s first Auto Show, which was held in February, 1920 at the Pleasant Street Armory. Twenty local businesses had spaces there and exhibited automobiles, cycles and a huge range of accessories. The show itself was, as the “Willimantic Daily Chronicle” said, “an elaborate affair” and included military marches, local singers and orchestras. The Leonard Brothers Garage provided the three Reo automobiles in the picture; a touring car, a sedan and a roadster. Pic of the Week August 21 , 2014
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Filename=pic2d.jpg Filesize=157KB Dimensions=1024x819 Date added=Feb 26, 2010
Loomer Opera House The Loomer Block dominated Main St. for several decades. The Loomer Opera House was considered to be the finest theater between Hartford and Providence. It seated 1,200 people in lush surroundings. Many famous vaudeville acts played there, including Buffalo Bill Cody, Charlie Chaplin and Stan Laurel. Lumber magnate Silas Loomer built it in 1879. Movies were shown there in the 1920s, but it could not compete with the Capitol Cinema. The Opera House was demolished in 1940 and replaced by a new Woolworth's store.The block also housed several other businesses including a pharmacy and a pool hall.
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Filename=mainst-a8.jpg Filesize=121KB Dimensions=1024x670 Date added=Jun 12, 2011
Main St. app. 1910This is a circa 1910 view of Main Street, Willimantic, looking westward. Note the trolley tracks in the middle of the road. This proves the photograph was taken after 1903, the year the tracks were laid. On the left is an automobile, but note the numerous horse drawn vehicles. This was also the period Main was graced with elm trees. They perished in the 1920s because of Dutch Elm Disease. Above the automobile is an ad for a vaudeville troupe appearing at the Loomer Opera House. Also note the telegraph and telephone poles.
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Filename=mainst--d.jpg Filesize=91KB Dimensions=1024x619 Date added=Jun 12, 2011
Main Street in the 1920sA view of Willimantic's Main Street in the 1920s. The Loomer Opera House can be seen on the left, and Lincoln Square is in the distance.
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Filename=pow-12-29-11.jpg Filesize=71KB Dimensions=1024x731 Date added=Dec 29, 2011
Borodach's Market - Corner of Valley and Jackson StreetsPic of the Week - December 29, 2011
Ada Kerachsky Albright correctly identified this picture as that of Borodach's Market. She said, "It was Borodach's for at least 40 years as far as I can determine. It started out as Borodach's Meat Market in the 1920s.."
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Filename=October02.jpg Filesize=225KB Dimensions=1024x714 Date added=Oct 02, 2010
The Remington Co.The Remington Co wasa clothing store owned by Homer Remington. It was located (we think) at 760 Main St. In 1920 the building was home to F.W. Woolworth..
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Filename=May01.jpg Filesize=54KB Dimensions=1024x620 Date added=May 01, 2010
Willimantic Lumber and Coal.The picture is of the Tudor-style exterior of the Willimantic Lumber and Coal Building shortly after completion around 1920.
 
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