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Filename=pic2.jpg Filesize=175KB Dimensions=1024x715 Date added=Feb 26, 2010
Brooklyn BridgeThe Willimantic Linen Company were early pioneers in the production of color lithographic advertising cards. This card was published in 1883, and depicts the recently completed Brooklyn Bridge in New York City, constructed from Willimantic cotton thread, spools, bobbins, and thread packing cases. Note the juxtaposition of the largest mill in the world. The Linen Company's Mill Number Four, built in 1880, floats in the sky above the world's largest bridge.
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Filename=pic04.jpg Filesize=159KB Dimensions=1024x659 Date added=Jan 23, 2011
Lyman Jordan's 1857 bridgeLyman Jordan's 1857 bridge, soon to become a decorative walkway and part of the Windham Mills State Park, is pictured in 1906 looking west.
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Filename=pic07.jpg Filesize=123KB Dimensions=1024x691 Date added=Jan 23, 2011
Bridge over the horseshoe bend of the Shetucket River This bridge over the horseshoe bend of the Shetucket River on Bricktop Road was replaced in 1987. Note its camelback steel truss construction, a popular design for highway bridges before World War One. Note the weight limitations on the sign to the right.
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Filename=pic11.jpg Filesize=142KB Dimensions=1024x691 Date added=Jan 23, 2011
Wooden covered bridgeSouth Windham's historic wooden covered bridge was replaced in 1910 to accommodate growing automobile traffic.
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Filename=pic10.jpg Filesize=151KB Dimensions=1024x666 Date added=Jan 23, 2011
Most historic bridge in WillimanticThis bridge is one of the most historic in Willimantic, but few know of its existence. It is pictured here in a 1939 aerial view. The bridge was built under electric floodlight in 1880. It is well known however to those who worked at the American Thread Company. It was the connection to Mill Number Four, the large cotton mill destroyed by fire in 1995.
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Filename=pic12.jpg Filesize=174KB Dimensions=1024x763 Date added=Jan 23, 2011
South Windham's covered bridgeThe entrance to South Windham's covered bridge, photographed a century ago.
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Filename=pic41.jpg Filesize=127KB Dimensions=1024x597 Date added=Jun 03, 2010
Railroad StreetThe west side of Railroad Street, pictured in the late 1960s from beneath the footbridge, just before redevelopment got underway. How many stores do you recall?
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Filename=mainst-east-a.jpg Filesize=135KB Dimensions=1024x744 Date added=Jun 12, 2011
This photograph of Lincoln Square was taken in 1905. The J.C. Lincoln building was Willimantic's own triangle building, and made the junction with Union and Main. Also, the central portion of buildings, facing Union and Lower Main, and extending towards Jackson Street and the mills, contained many businesses. The Lincoln Square area was referred to in the 19th century as 'downtown', and was a favoured location for the new town hall, eventually built in 1896 in its current location. The town couldn't obtain the Lincoln Square property as prices were too high, and instead the city fathers went 'uptown' to the junction of Main and Bridge, and much to the chagrin of many built the new town hall there. So Lincoln Square may have been saved if the town hall had replaced the Lincoln Block 'triangle building'.
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Filename=4-17-14pow.jpg Filesize=292KB Dimensions=1218x938 Date added=Apr 20, 2014
Clark-Hurley Hardware Company(left to right) Burt Trowbridge, Herbert Clark, James Hurley and Jay E. Grant are shown inside the Clark-Hurley Hardware Company. Clark sold his share to Grant and the company became the one we all knew – Hurley-Grant Hardware on the corner of Railroad and Main Streets. Pic of the Week April 17, 2014
     
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