ThreadCity.com

ThreadCity.com Homepage

If you have photos and would like to see them here, Contact Us


Home ::
Album list :: Search

Search results - "cotton"
pic3.jpg
Close
Filename=pic3.jpg Filesize=121KB Dimensions=1024x592 Date added=Feb 26, 2010
JumboWhen Barnum and Bailey's Circus brought Jumbo, the largest elephant in captivity, from England to the United States in the 1880s, it hit the national headlines. The Willimantic Linen Company soon jumped on the bandwagon and produced this card. It depicts Jumbo being dragged through the streets of New York City with unbreakable Willimantic cotton thread!
pic4.jpg
Close
Filename=pic4.jpg Filesize=138KB Dimensions=1024x693 Date added=Feb 26, 2010
Cute kidsCute kids are favored by advertisers today. It was no different a century ago! This card depicts three young girls becoming entangled in Willimantic cotton thread.
pic5.jpg
Close
Filename=pic5.jpg Filesize=125KB Dimensions=683x1024 Date added=Feb 26, 2010
Cute kids and animalsCute kids -- and cute animals are used to sell products, then and now. Although the dog in this 1885 winter scene is not that cute! Note the large spool of Willimantic cotton thread on the sleigh.
pic1.jpg
Close
Filename=pic1.jpg Filesize=127KB Dimensions=1024x627 Date added=Feb 26, 2010
PuckThe Willimantic Linen Company employed both popular and elite culture to advertise their products. This 1888 card depicts the mischievous Puck, from Shakespeare's Midsummer Night's Dream, wrapping not a girdle of silver thread around the earth, but a girdle of Willimantic cotton thread!
pic2.jpg
Close
Filename=pic2.jpg Filesize=175KB Dimensions=1024x715 Date added=Feb 26, 2010
Brooklyn BridgeThe Willimantic Linen Company were early pioneers in the production of color lithographic advertising cards. This card was published in 1883, and depicts the recently completed Brooklyn Bridge in New York City, constructed from Willimantic cotton thread, spools, bobbins, and thread packing cases. Note the juxtaposition of the largest mill in the world. The Linen Company's Mill Number Four, built in 1880, floats in the sky above the world's largest bridge.
pic6.jpg
Close
Filename=pic6.jpg Filesize=127KB Dimensions=663x1024 Date added=Feb 26, 2010
Willimantic Linen Company's Number Three MillThis 1910 postcard depicts the Willimantic Linen Company's Number Three Mill. It was erected in 1845 by the Wellesville Company on the site of Willimantic's first cotton mill built by Perez Richmond in 1822. The Wellesville mill became part of the Linen Company in 1876. It was demolished in the late 1920s, and stood on the city's Recreation Park. This idyllic view depicts the mill raceway and provides a somewhat over romantic view of industrialization, in a style known as "the factory in the garden."
pic8.jpg
Close
Filename=pic8.jpg Filesize=191KB Dimensions=1024x808 Date added=Feb 26, 2010
GulliverWhen first published in 1726, Jonathan Swift's book Gulliver's Travels caught the public's imagination and instantly became a best seller. The Willimantic Linen Company quickly exploited the book's popularity. This 1884 lithograph depicts the Lilliputians tying down Lemuel Gulliver with Willimantic's "best six cord spool cotton." The artists hired by the Willimantic Linen Company always ingeniously incorporated spools of cotton into the scenes.
pic10.jpg
Close
Filename=pic10.jpg Filesize=151KB Dimensions=1024x666 Date added=Jan 23, 2011
Most historic bridge in WillimanticThis bridge is one of the most historic in Willimantic, but few know of its existence. It is pictured here in a 1939 aerial view. The bridge was built under electric floodlight in 1880. It is well known however to those who worked at the American Thread Company. It was the connection to Mill Number Four, the large cotton mill destroyed by fire in 1995.
pic13.jpg
Close
Filename=pic13.jpg Filesize=199KB Dimensions=1024x626 Date added=Jan 23, 2011
Southwest view WillimanticThis is a circa 1837 drawing by John Warner Barber of the southwest view Willimantic. The Windham Manufacturing Company's cotton mills can be seen on the left. This wooden bridge over the Willimantic River was constantly being damaged by floods, and was eventually replaced by the largest stone arch bridge in Connecticut, built by Lyman Jordan in 1869
pic5.jpg
Close
Filename=pic5.jpg Filesize=124KB Dimensions=1024x461 Date added=Feb 26, 2010
Company box top Willimantic spool cotton -- a company box top printed in Willimantic in 1900
pic1.jpg
Close
Filename=pic1.jpg Filesize=93KB Dimensions=1024x643 Date added=Feb 26, 2010
Windham Manufacturing CompanyThe Windham Manufacturing Company's Willimantic mills are seen here in 1907. This Company was organized in 1824, and became one of America's largest producers of "duck cloth" used extensively in sailing ship sails. The mills closed for cotton cloth production in 1928, but were home for several industries until their demolition in 1974.
stan-29tc.jpg
Close
Filename=stan-29tc.jpg Filesize=850KB Dimensions=575x1080 Date added=Feb 12, 2013
Horace Hall Elixir Pro BottleHorace Hall was a local merchant, dealing in "groceries, provisions, flour, grain, and meal. Also Drugs, Medicines, dye stuffs, Paints, and oils" He was a Justice of the Peace for the Town of Windham and a superintendent of the Windham Cotton Manufacturing Company. He died in 1882. (Photo courtesy of Stan)
pic3m.jpg
Close
Filename=pic3m.jpg Filesize=100KB Dimensions=1024x582 Date added=Feb 26, 2010
Smithville Manufacturing CompanyThe Smithville Manufacturing Company's cotton mills stood on the eastern side of Bridge Street. The company was well known for its high quality duck cloth, a hardwearing cotton cloth that was used in sailing ship sails, and in sailors' uniforms. Cotton cloth had been weaved on this site since the early 1820s. The mills were demolished in 1940. The view on the right is taken from atop a Main Street business block and shows the company's dam and its stone worker housing in the bottom right hand corner.
pic4w.jpg
Close
Filename=pic4w.jpg Filesize=126KB Dimensions=1024x622 Date added=Feb 26, 2010
Victorian homeBeyond its cotton thread and railroad links, Willimantic is also renowned for its magnificent Victorian mansions. Here's a view of a few of them, built during the 1890s on Windham Street in the city's famed hill district.
pic08.jpg
Close
Filename=pic08.jpg Filesize=163KB Dimensions=1024x705 Date added=Jan 23, 2011
Asa and Seth Jillson's 1826 cotton mill Asa and Seth Jillson's 1826 cotton mill can be seen in this 1916 photograph. It stood almost opposite to the entrance to Jackson Street. The entrance to the Thread City Crossing is located several feet to the west of where this historic mill was located.
mills-pollack.jpg
Close
Filename=mills-pollack.jpg Filesize=110KB Dimensions=1024x594 Date added=Jun 12, 2011
Conantville Silk Mill Mansfield's Conantville Silk Mill was built just before the Civil War. It was taken over by Max Pollack in the early 20th century to manufacture cotton thread. The old mill building is perhaps known to locals as the Shaboo Club, which burnt down in the late 1970s. The Eastbrook Shopping Mall stands on the site today
18 files on 2 page(s) 1