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Filename=pic3.jpg Filesize=121KB Dimensions=1024x592 Date added=Feb 26, 2010
JumboWhen Barnum and Bailey's Circus brought Jumbo, the largest elephant in captivity, from England to the United States in the 1880s, it hit the national headlines. The Willimantic Linen Company soon jumped on the bandwagon and produced this card. It depicts Jumbo being dragged through the streets of New York City with unbreakable Willimantic cotton thread!
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Filename=pic1.jpg Filesize=127KB Dimensions=1024x627 Date added=Feb 26, 2010
PuckThe Willimantic Linen Company employed both popular and elite culture to advertise their products. This 1888 card depicts the mischievous Puck, from Shakespeare's Midsummer Night's Dream, wrapping not a girdle of silver thread around the earth, but a girdle of Willimantic cotton thread!
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Filename=pic2.jpg Filesize=175KB Dimensions=1024x715 Date added=Feb 26, 2010
Brooklyn BridgeThe Willimantic Linen Company were early pioneers in the production of color lithographic advertising cards. This card was published in 1883, and depicts the recently completed Brooklyn Bridge in New York City, constructed from Willimantic cotton thread, spools, bobbins, and thread packing cases. Note the juxtaposition of the largest mill in the world. The Linen Company's Mill Number Four, built in 1880, floats in the sky above the world's largest bridge.
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Filename=pic6.jpg Filesize=127KB Dimensions=663x1024 Date added=Feb 26, 2010
Willimantic Linen Company's Number Three MillThis 1910 postcard depicts the Willimantic Linen Company's Number Three Mill. It was erected in 1845 by the Wellesville Company on the site of Willimantic's first cotton mill built by Perez Richmond in 1822. The Wellesville mill became part of the Linen Company in 1876. It was demolished in the late 1920s, and stood on the city's Recreation Park. This idyllic view depicts the mill raceway and provides a somewhat over romantic view of industrialization, in a style known as "the factory in the garden."
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Filename=pic8.jpg Filesize=191KB Dimensions=1024x808 Date added=Feb 26, 2010
GulliverWhen first published in 1726, Jonathan Swift's book Gulliver's Travels caught the public's imagination and instantly became a best seller. The Willimantic Linen Company quickly exploited the book's popularity. This 1884 lithograph depicts the Lilliputians tying down Lemuel Gulliver with Willimantic's "best six cord spool cotton." The artists hired by the Willimantic Linen Company always ingeniously incorporated spools of cotton into the scenes.
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Filename=pic6.jpg Filesize=162KB Dimensions=1024x606 Date added=Feb 26, 2010
Willimantic Linen Company The Willimantic Linen Company was formed in 1854 and built its Mill One in 1857. Note the tunnel under the highway to give access to the transportation locomotive.
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Filename=001.jpg Filesize=299KB Dimensions=1024x886 Date added=Apr 18, 2010
In 1948, a company from Boston, Tichnor Quality Views, published a wallet of colorized postcard views of Willimantic, Coventry and the University of Connecticut printed on linen-style paper. They provide a valuable historical document of life in northeast Connecticut more than half a century ago.
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Filename=pic2.jpg Filesize=103KB Dimensions=1024x638 Date added=Feb 26, 2010
Mill Number TwoThis 1864 is a woodcut of the Willimantic Linen Company's Mill Number Two. Contact us if you want a print. It's ideal for framing, and compliments Andrew Wyeth's well known print of Mill Number Two. It's also a wonderful historical document.
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Filename=pic3.jpg Filesize=153KB Dimensions=1024x696 Date added=Feb 26, 2010
Mill Number TwoThis is the Williantic Linen Company's Mill Number Two, pictured from the east in 1908. Note the large elm trees, which once dominated the city's streets.
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Filename=pic4.jpg Filesize=105KB Dimensions=1024x651 Date added=Jun 03, 2010
Dr. Mason's HospitalThis picture is of Dr. Mason's Hospital at Fairview Avenue in 1920. It was built in 1880 as a home by William Barrows, the president of the Willimantic Linen Company. The rambling mansion was purchased circa 1908 by Dr. Louis Irving Mason (1865-1930), and in 1911 he built the extension on the rear. In 1939 it became the home of the Spector family, and also the site of summer theatre, thus laying the roots of the Windham Theatre Guild. The magnificent building was demolished in 1979.
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Filename=1-2-14a.jpg Filesize=180KB Dimensions=540x441 Date added=Jan 16, 2014
Willimantic Linen Company - 1876 Centennial Exposition - PhotoHere is the photo from which the engraving was done.
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Filename=7-23-2015-a.jpg Filesize=214KB Dimensions=1539x888 Date added=Jul 22, 2015
Picnic - July 16, 1890Among the men identified are :Arthur Bill (General Manager of Hall and Bill Printing Co.) , James Ross (the agent for Eagleville Mills) , Oscar Tanner (tavern owner and soon-to-be Willimantic mayor), Charles Boss (owner of Church St. lumberyard), Charles Leonard (chief engineer of the Fire Department) , Jim Reed , Jim Small (hotel owner) , Eugene Boss (agent for Willimantic Linen/ATCO).
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Filename=6-15-2017-pow-a.JPG Filesize=354KB Dimensions=1014x1600 Date added=Jun 22, 2017
Entrance to Dr. Mason's HospitalThis was the entrance to Dr. Mason’s Hospital on Fairview Street. Dr. Mason practiced in Willimantic from 1909 to 1930. The hospital was originally built in 1881 as a home for Willimantic Linen Company president William Barrows. The building was demolished in 1974.
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Filename=August06.jpg Filesize=89KB Dimensions=1024x536 Date added=Aug 06, 2010
The OaksThe Oaks was developed in 1890 by the Willimantic Linen Company as a new phase in its housing program (the housing program commenced in 1865). Forty houses were erected using 4 basic floor plans. All have six rooms, though varying considerably in the arrangement and size of rooms and closet accommodation. All the houses have front porches opening either to halls or vestibules.
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Filename=pic5w.jpg Filesize=114KB Dimensions=738x1024 Date added=Feb 26, 2010
Windham Textile and History Museum The Windham Textile and History Museum located at 157 Union/Main Street, has occupied the Willimantic Linen Company's 1877 company store since it was founded in 1985 by Laura Knott Twine.
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Filename=tc-ephem-ii.jpg Filesize=773KB Dimensions=864x1098 Date added=Mar 02, 2013
Willimantic Linen Company
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