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Filename=pic7.jpg Filesize=119KB Dimensions=1024x630 Date added=Feb 26, 2010
Welcome to WillimanticThis welcome to Willimantic card was one of a series of colorized postcards of the city produced in the late 1940s. Each letter of the city depicts another local scene published in the series.
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Filename=pic2.jpg Filesize=95KB Dimensions=1024x570 Date added=Feb 26, 2010
Tinker Ted's Taxi ServiceWhen Ted Marrotte was 21, his father Arman Trudeau, a well known local grocer, loaned him the money to purchase the city's first taxi cab, and launch the first motorized jitney service. Here is Marrotte's business card.
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Filename=gall27.jpg Filesize=182KB Dimensions=1024x1009 Date added=Jul 13, 2011
Governor Cross at WCMHMay 11, 1932. Governor Wilbur Lucius Cross speaks at the dedication of the new Windham Community Memorial Hospital. In 1929, it was decided that St. Joseph's Hospital on Jackson needed much more space than was available. Cooperation between St. Joseph's hospital board and local businesses and benefactors led to the planning and building of the new hospital.
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Filename=1-7-2016-pow.jpg Filesize=309KB Dimensions=2047x1025 Date added=Jan 07, 2016
Pic of the Week January 7, 2015From the 1920s until the early 40s, marching bands and dance bands provided much of the music for all types of Willimantic events. The “Al-Pierre Tabarin” on Valley Street was one of Eastern Connecticut’s premier dance spots. Hal White had studied at the Boston Conservatory of Music and put this band together in the early 1930s. Local musicians included Kerman Lavigne (tenor sax), Clarence Sylvester (banjo), Bill and Ray Buckingham (trumpets), Roy Grover (drums),Lester Carter (piano), Rodney Clune (alto sax), and Hal White (violin and sax).
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Filename=laramee.jpg Filesize=917KB Dimensions=864x648 Date added=May 12, 2016
The Laramee CompanyThe Laramee Company’s delivery vehicles and staff are shown outside the market which was located at 22 North Street. The Laramee Company was one of the first local businesses to install refrigerated cases for meats and other goods. The man with the boater hat was owner Pierre J. Laramee who later became Mayor of Willimantic.
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Filename=POW-9-5-2013.jpg Filesize=320KB Dimensions=858x693 Date added=Sep 05, 2013
Memorial Day, 1911This photo shows the 1911 Memorial Day parade.The drum belonged to Wheeler's American Band which accompanied the Police Department in that parade and behind Wheeler's was the local National Guard Company, Company "L". In back of Company "L" is the French-Canadian paramilitary organization, Garde Florimond. They had already marched up Main St. and were "picking up" the Grand Army of the Republic and Women’s Relief Corps Floral Wagon, The Spanish-American War veterans and a large contingent of children from Natchaug School for the march to Willimantic Cemetery. The parade of 1911 was the first in which a group of schoolchildren was asked to participate. Pic of the Week September 5, 2013
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Filename=df-a.jpg Filesize=870KB Dimensions=1200x669 Date added=Nov 01, 2012
Sherman's Corner - Chaplin, CTPic of the Week - November 1, 2012. Chaplin First selectman Bill Rose was among the people who identified last week’s photo as “Sherman’s Corner” in Chaplin. Bill wrote, “In the era pictured it was a gas station, bus stop, bar and grill and the local hot spot for night time entertainment. Today it is the home of the Bach Dor Cafe.
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Filename=4-9-2015.jpg Filesize=937KB Dimensions=1392x1117 Date added=Apr 16, 2015
The Knights of Columbus Boys BandThe Knights of Columbus Boys Band stands in front of the north door of Natchaug School. . It was organized in 1917 by Charles Wheeler and played at Willimantic events until the early 1930s. They are in front of the north door of Natchaug School. This band started out as "The American Boy's Band" and was part of a local Boy Scout Troop. When the troop lost its charter, Wheeler was able to get a new sponsor - the Knights of Columbus. Years later, the band became known as "The Thread City Cadets.
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Filename=6-2-2016-pow.jpg Filesize=167KB Dimensions=1802x1210 Date added=Jun 09, 2016
BPOE Elks BandThe band was led by local legendary musician Charles Wheeler (kneeling, to the right of the drum).
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Filename=1925 strike-4.jpg Filesize=720KB Dimensions=1800x1210 Date added=Jun 16, 2013
ATCO's 1925 StrikeSome twenty tents were erected and the official opening of the “tent city” took place on July 7 when William Green of Washington, D.C., national
president of the American Federation of Labor delivered an address to the local strikers. For a time some of the tents were occupied by families of
strikers.
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Filename=stan-29tc.jpg Filesize=850KB Dimensions=575x1080 Date added=Feb 12, 2013
Horace Hall Elixir Pro BottleHorace Hall was a local merchant, dealing in "groceries, provisions, flour, grain, and meal. Also Drugs, Medicines, dye stuffs, Paints, and oils" He was a Justice of the Peace for the Town of Windham and a superintendent of the Windham Cotton Manufacturing Company. He died in 1882. (Photo courtesy of Stan)
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Filename=4-13-2017boys band-1.jpg Filesize=69KB Dimensions=746x482 Date added=Apr 13, 2017
KofC Boys' BandPictured are members of the Knights of Columbus Boy’s Band. The band later became known as the Willimantic Cadets and was led by local legendary bandmaster Charles Wheeler. The photo was taken in front of the Loomer Opera House.
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Filename=January15.jpg Filesize=190KB Dimensions=1024x586 Date added=Jan 15, 2011
ScotlandPic of the Week - January 15, 2010The picture is of the Scotland, CT town green. The camera is facing East. I apologize for being a bit inaccurate in saying that the Green hasn't changed much in a hundred years. The large building in the almost center of the picture is no longer there. I actually had to look at the picture several times before realizing that something didn't seem to agree with the present makeup of the Green.
Clay and I appreciate all comments about any of our Pics of the Week. This week, I thought it was interesting that possibilities included Columbia and Hampton. So many town Greens are basically the same - with a church and/or other meeting house, a Town Hall and some public building (such as a hotel) for housing. I've included the following excerpt from "www.towngreens.com".

"The Green and its streetscape accurately reflect the development of Scotland since it was established, including the contemporary St. Margaret's Church sited next to the staid Congregational Church and Chapel. This is one of the charms of the town center, as is the c. 1920 bungalow tucked between the town hall and dwelling built during the Colonial period. However, the green can only support a certain amount of change before it loses its character. This is already happening due to some unsympathetic remodeling/conversions. There is also a large empty lot facing the green where a hotel once stood that will some day be developed.
In addition, there is some local concern that the Department of Transportation has plans to modify the sight lines in order to improve traffic safety which could adversely affect the green.

Most likely a town center began to develop when Scotland was allowed to build a pound for its livestock and a school for the children. It was not until 1727 when perhaps as many as 80 families were living in the area that Scotland was granted winter privileges. Finally, in 1732, a separate ecclesiastical society was established and according to Bayles, the place for the meetinghouse was established on a knoll on the east side of Merricks Brook and the south side of the road from Windham to Canterbury. Nathanial Huntington deeded .25 acre to the Society and in November 1733 the first meeting was held in the meetinghouse that was constructed on the present Scotland green.
In 1772, a new meetinghouse was built on the site of the present Congregational Church (1842) and the original meetinghouse was removed from the green. Concern was voiced in 1774 that the school house, so close to the meetinghouse, could endanger it should there be a fire. As a result, the school house was moved a suitable distance away.... The Scotland Green was established as a site for the meetinghouse when the Ecclesiastical Society was created in 1732. It was then and is now the heart of the community around which the important civic, religious and commercial buildings have always been located."
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Hope Valley Band-Ralph Cabit.jpg
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Filename=Hope Valley Band-Ralph Cabit.jpg Filesize=75KB Dimensions=1024x465 Date added=Jun 22, 2010
Hope Valley BandThis is a photo of the Hope Valley Band playing in March, 1970 at Purple Heart, a social center in Willimantic. From left to right, Ralph Cabit-guitar , Dick Theriault-singer, John Boudreau-drums, Dave Dinse-guitar, Ray Macht-bass. Photo courtesy of Ralph Cabit. If any of our visitors has a picture of early local bands, please let us know so that we can post them here.
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Filename=stan-lucius bigelow.jpg Filesize=792KB Dimensions=1548x1040 Date added=Dec 12, 2013
Lucius BigelowLucius Bigelow was a tin peddler from Simsbury who made the rounds of the city on a regular basis. Peddlers, especially tin peddlers, often incurred the distaste of local businesses because peddlers paid no taxes. Pic of the Week December 12, 2013
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Filename=pic6e.jpg Filesize=135KB Dimensions=1024x637 Date added=Jun 03, 2010
Willimantic Moose ClubThe Willimantic Moose Club, local 1440, was located in this fine house on the north side of Pleasant Street for many years. The house was built in 1848 for John Tracy, the Agent for the Windham Manufacturing Company's mills on Bridge Street. Tracy was a founder of the Willimantic Savings Institute in 1842. The building still stands just west of the Armoury. The Moose Club subsequently moved to Brook Street, and took over the old Polish Club, when that institution built a new club on Ives Street circa 1933.
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