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Filename=pic2.jpg Filesize=175KB Dimensions=1024x715 Date added=Feb 26, 2010
Brooklyn BridgeThe Willimantic Linen Company were early pioneers in the production of color lithographic advertising cards. This card was published in 1883, and depicts the recently completed Brooklyn Bridge in New York City, constructed from Willimantic cotton thread, spools, bobbins, and thread packing cases. Note the juxtaposition of the largest mill in the world. The Linen Company's Mill Number Four, built in 1880, floats in the sky above the world's largest bridge.
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Filename=pic6.jpg Filesize=127KB Dimensions=663x1024 Date added=Feb 26, 2010
Willimantic Linen Company's Number Three MillThis 1910 postcard depicts the Willimantic Linen Company's Number Three Mill. It was erected in 1845 by the Wellesville Company on the site of Willimantic's first cotton mill built by Perez Richmond in 1822. The Wellesville mill became part of the Linen Company in 1876. It was demolished in the late 1920s, and stood on the city's Recreation Park. This idyllic view depicts the mill raceway and provides a somewhat over romantic view of industrialization, in a style known as "the factory in the garden."
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Filename=pic04.jpg Filesize=159KB Dimensions=1024x659 Date added=Jan 23, 2011
Lyman Jordan's 1857 bridgeLyman Jordan's 1857 bridge, soon to become a decorative walkway and part of the Windham Mills State Park, is pictured in 1906 looking west.
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Filename=pic09.jpg Filesize=100KB Dimensions=611x900 Date added=Jan 23, 2011
Foundations of the Jillson MillThe foundations of the Jillson mill pictured shortly before bridge construction began in early 1999.
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Filename=pic10.jpg Filesize=151KB Dimensions=1024x666 Date added=Jan 23, 2011
Most historic bridge in WillimanticThis bridge is one of the most historic in Willimantic, but few know of its existence. It is pictured here in a 1939 aerial view. The bridge was built under electric floodlight in 1880. It is well known however to those who worked at the American Thread Company. It was the connection to Mill Number Four, the large cotton mill destroyed by fire in 1995.
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Filename=pic13.jpg Filesize=199KB Dimensions=1024x626 Date added=Jan 23, 2011
Southwest view WillimanticThis is a circa 1837 drawing by John Warner Barber of the southwest view Willimantic. The Windham Manufacturing Company's cotton mills can be seen on the left. This wooden bridge over the Willimantic River was constantly being damaged by floods, and was eventually replaced by the largest stone arch bridge in Connecticut, built by Lyman Jordan in 1869
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Filename=pic14.jpg Filesize=123KB Dimensions=1024x575 Date added=Jan 23, 2011
1869 stone arch bridgeJordan's magnificent 1869 stone arch bridge still carries Bridge Street over the Willimantic River. The view is looking west, and the mills in the distance belong to the Windham Manufacturing Company. The photograph was taken in 1891.
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Filename=003.jpg Filesize=209KB Dimensions=1024x651 Date added=Feb 12, 2011
South Coventry
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Filename=Scan_Pic0008.jpg Filesize=454KB Dimensions=720x878 Date added=Apr 29, 2012
Thread MillsWe are grateful to the copyright owner, "The Chronicle", for permission to use the above images and story from the May, 1992 anniversary edition of "The Chronicle". Further reproduction without permission is prohibited.
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Filename=tc-bridges-a.jpg Filesize=271KB Dimensions=620x446 Date added=May 11, 2013
Bridge Street Jordan's 1869 stone arch bridge with the former Quidnick-Windham mill in the background.
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Filename=pic6.jpg Filesize=162KB Dimensions=1024x606 Date added=Feb 26, 2010
Willimantic Linen Company The Willimantic Linen Company was formed in 1854 and built its Mill One in 1857. Note the tunnel under the highway to give access to the transportation locomotive.
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Filename=11-19-2015xxxxx-a.jpg Filesize=286KB Dimensions=1563x1048 Date added=Nov 19, 2015
Mill HousingBrian Zoldak and Jamie Eves identified this photo as mill housing with the photo y being taken from either Dunham or Chapman Street. Mill Number Two is in the background. Jamie Eves says, “... the building on the right is likely the center of Mill Number Two, and the one on the left is the eastern extension, originally a separate building.”..
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Filename=pic2.jpg Filesize=103KB Dimensions=1024x638 Date added=Feb 26, 2010
Mill Number TwoThis 1864 is a woodcut of the Willimantic Linen Company's Mill Number Two. Contact us if you want a print. It's ideal for framing, and compliments Andrew Wyeth's well known print of Mill Number Two. It's also a wonderful historical document.
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Filename=pic1.jpg Filesize=93KB Dimensions=1024x643 Date added=Feb 26, 2010
Windham Manufacturing CompanyThe Windham Manufacturing Company's Willimantic mills are seen here in 1907. This Company was organized in 1824, and became one of America's largest producers of "duck cloth" used extensively in sailing ship sails. The mills closed for cotton cloth production in 1928, but were home for several industries until their demolition in 1974.
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Filename=Bingham (tc1).jpg Filesize=535KB Dimensions=960x595 Date added=Jan 11, 2013
Bingham's Mill
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Filename=pic3.jpg Filesize=153KB Dimensions=1024x696 Date added=Feb 26, 2010
Mill Number TwoThis is the Williantic Linen Company's Mill Number Two, pictured from the east in 1908. Note the large elm trees, which once dominated the city's streets.
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