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Filename=pic04.jpg Filesize=159KB Dimensions=1024x659 Date added=Jan 23, 2011
Lyman Jordan's 1857 bridgeLyman Jordan's 1857 bridge, soon to become a decorative walkway and part of the Windham Mills State Park, is pictured in 1906 looking west.
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Filename=pic13.jpg Filesize=199KB Dimensions=1024x626 Date added=Jan 23, 2011
Southwest view WillimanticThis is a circa 1837 drawing by John Warner Barber of the southwest view Willimantic. The Windham Manufacturing Company's cotton mills can be seen on the left. This wooden bridge over the Willimantic River was constantly being damaged by floods, and was eventually replaced by the largest stone arch bridge in Connecticut, built by Lyman Jordan in 1869
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Filename=pic14.jpg Filesize=123KB Dimensions=1024x575 Date added=Jan 23, 2011
1869 stone arch bridgeJordan's magnificent 1869 stone arch bridge still carries Bridge Street over the Willimantic River. The view is looking west, and the mills in the distance belong to the Windham Manufacturing Company. The photograph was taken in 1891.
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Filename=Scan_Pic0008.jpg Filesize=454KB Dimensions=720x878 Date added=Apr 29, 2012
Thread MillsWe are grateful to the copyright owner, "The Chronicle", for permission to use the above images and story from the May, 1992 anniversary edition of "The Chronicle". Further reproduction without permission is prohibited.
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Filename=pic1.jpg Filesize=93KB Dimensions=1024x643 Date added=Feb 26, 2010
Windham Manufacturing CompanyThe Windham Manufacturing Company's Willimantic mills are seen here in 1907. This Company was organized in 1824, and became one of America's largest producers of "duck cloth" used extensively in sailing ship sails. The mills closed for cotton cloth production in 1928, but were home for several industries until their demolition in 1974.
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Filename=pic8.jpg Filesize=85KB Dimensions=1024x450 Date added=Feb 26, 2010
Windham Manufacturing CompanyThe Windham Manufacturing Company's mills were located on Bridge Street. The buildings were later occupied by the Quidnick-Windham Company, a silk manufacturing company, and after World War Two by the Electromotive Company.
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Filename=mainst-east-a.jpg Filesize=135KB Dimensions=1024x744 Date added=Jun 12, 2011
This photograph of Lincoln Square was taken in 1905. The J.C. Lincoln building was Willimantic's own triangle building, and made the junction with Union and Main. Also, the central portion of buildings, facing Union and Lower Main, and extending towards Jackson Street and the mills, contained many businesses. The Lincoln Square area was referred to in the 19th century as 'downtown', and was a favoured location for the new town hall, eventually built in 1896 in its current location. The town couldn't obtain the Lincoln Square property as prices were too high, and instead the city fathers went 'uptown' to the junction of Main and Bridge, and much to the chagrin of many built the new town hall there. So Lincoln Square may have been saved if the town hall had replaced the Lincoln Block 'triangle building'.
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Filename=pic2.jpg Filesize=155KB Dimensions=1024x765 Date added=Mar 13, 2010
Thread City SquareThread City Square pictured in 1908. This area stood across from the American Thread Mills One, Five and Six, and the old turnpike to Norwich.
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Filename=7-23-2015-a.jpg Filesize=214KB Dimensions=1539x888 Date added=Jul 22, 2015
Picnic - July 16, 1890Among the men identified are :Arthur Bill (General Manager of Hall and Bill Printing Co.) , James Ross (the agent for Eagleville Mills) , Oscar Tanner (tavern owner and soon-to-be Willimantic mayor), Charles Boss (owner of Church St. lumberyard), Charles Leonard (chief engineer of the Fire Department) , Jim Reed , Jim Small (hotel owner) , Eugene Boss (agent for Willimantic Linen/ATCO).
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Filename=pic5m.jpg Filesize=80KB Dimensions=1024x590 Date added=Feb 26, 2010
Morrison Machine Company & Natchaug Silk CompanyThe Morrison Machine Company's factory is the wooden structure, and was located on Valley Street.
The Natchaug Silk Company's mills, built in 1888, stood on North Street. The Morrisons manufactured silk spinning machinery, and the Natchaug Company was famous for its high quality dress silk. The former company's mills were taken over by the Windham Silk Company in 1910. The latter company went into liquidation in 1895, due to a financial scandal. The Brand Company later used their mills in the 1950s.
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Filename=pic3.jpg Filesize=127KB Dimensions=1024x635 Date added=Mar 13, 2010
Industrial Willimantic in 1908Industrial Willimantic in 1908. Note the 1850s gasworks to the right, and the 1820s Smithville mills at Bridge Street. This shot was taken from the footbridge.
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Filename=pic3m.jpg Filesize=100KB Dimensions=1024x582 Date added=Feb 26, 2010
Smithville Manufacturing CompanyThe Smithville Manufacturing Company's cotton mills stood on the eastern side of Bridge Street. The company was well known for its high quality duck cloth, a hardwearing cotton cloth that was used in sailing ship sails, and in sailors' uniforms. Cotton cloth had been weaved on this site since the early 1820s. The mills were demolished in 1940. The view on the right is taken from atop a Main Street business block and shows the company's dam and its stone worker housing in the bottom right hand corner.
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Filename=Christmas-1963-ArmandBiron.jpg Filesize=85KB Dimensions=576x729 Date added=Dec 19, 2013
Christmas Season 1953This week's pic was taken by Armand Biron in 1963 and is used with his permission. At 50 years old, it is one of the few pictures showing the old Christmas decorations on Main St. Note the tree in Lincoln Square, the lights and lighted reindeer on what was then the Sears store, the lights of ATCO’s Number Five and Six mills at top center and even the lights of cars on RT 32 heading toward Jillson Hill. Courtesy of Armand Biron
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Filename=pic6e.jpg Filesize=135KB Dimensions=1024x637 Date added=Jun 03, 2010
Willimantic Moose ClubThe Willimantic Moose Club, local 1440, was located in this fine house on the north side of Pleasant Street for many years. The house was built in 1848 for John Tracy, the Agent for the Windham Manufacturing Company's mills on Bridge Street. Tracy was a founder of the Willimantic Savings Institute in 1842. The building still stands just west of the Armoury. The Moose Club subsequently moved to Brook Street, and took over the old Polish Club, when that institution built a new club on Ives Street circa 1933.
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Filename=11-17-2016-pow-a.jpg Filesize=365KB Dimensions=2046x1152 Date added=Nov 23, 2016
Bridge Street Railroad DepotThis is the railroad depot just west of Bridge Street. It originally served the Quidnick-Windham mills. And, as Joseph "Al" Beaulieu points out, it was the Railway Express Station.
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Filename=picm6.jpg Filesize=98KB Dimensions=1024x678 Date added=Feb 26, 2010
Holland Silk CompanyThe Holland Silk Company's mills manufactured high quality silk thread in Willimantic from 1864 until 1937, the year the company located to Pennsylvania. The Holland brothers came from neighboring Mansfield, one of the first towns in the United States to manufacture silk thread.
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