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Filename=pic3.jpg Filesize=121KB Dimensions=1024x592 Date added=Feb 26, 2010
JumboWhen Barnum and Bailey's Circus brought Jumbo, the largest elephant in captivity, from England to the United States in the 1880s, it hit the national headlines. The Willimantic Linen Company soon jumped on the bandwagon and produced this card. It depicts Jumbo being dragged through the streets of New York City with unbreakable Willimantic cotton thread!
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Filename=pic5.jpg Filesize=125KB Dimensions=683x1024 Date added=Feb 26, 2010
Cute kids and animalsCute kids -- and cute animals are used to sell products, then and now. Although the dog in this 1885 winter scene is not that cute! Note the large spool of Willimantic cotton thread on the sleigh.
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Filename=pic1.jpg Filesize=127KB Dimensions=1024x627 Date added=Feb 26, 2010
PuckThe Willimantic Linen Company employed both popular and elite culture to advertise their products. This 1888 card depicts the mischievous Puck, from Shakespeare's Midsummer Night's Dream, wrapping not a girdle of silver thread around the earth, but a girdle of Willimantic cotton thread!
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Filename=pic2.jpg Filesize=175KB Dimensions=1024x715 Date added=Feb 26, 2010
Brooklyn BridgeThe Willimantic Linen Company were early pioneers in the production of color lithographic advertising cards. This card was published in 1883, and depicts the recently completed Brooklyn Bridge in New York City, constructed from Willimantic cotton thread, spools, bobbins, and thread packing cases. Note the juxtaposition of the largest mill in the world. The Linen Company's Mill Number Four, built in 1880, floats in the sky above the world's largest bridge.
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Filename=pic6.jpg Filesize=127KB Dimensions=663x1024 Date added=Feb 26, 2010
Willimantic Linen Company's Number Three MillThis 1910 postcard depicts the Willimantic Linen Company's Number Three Mill. It was erected in 1845 by the Wellesville Company on the site of Willimantic's first cotton mill built by Perez Richmond in 1822. The Wellesville mill became part of the Linen Company in 1876. It was demolished in the late 1920s, and stood on the city's Recreation Park. This idyllic view depicts the mill raceway and provides a somewhat over romantic view of industrialization, in a style known as "the factory in the garden."
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Filename=pic7.jpg Filesize=119KB Dimensions=1024x630 Date added=Feb 26, 2010
Welcome to WillimanticThis welcome to Willimantic card was one of a series of colorized postcards of the city produced in the late 1940s. Each letter of the city depicts another local scene published in the series.
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Filename=pic8.jpg Filesize=191KB Dimensions=1024x808 Date added=Feb 26, 2010
GulliverWhen first published in 1726, Jonathan Swift's book Gulliver's Travels caught the public's imagination and instantly became a best seller. The Willimantic Linen Company quickly exploited the book's popularity. This 1884 lithograph depicts the Lilliputians tying down Lemuel Gulliver with Willimantic's "best six cord spool cotton." The artists hired by the Willimantic Linen Company always ingeniously incorporated spools of cotton into the scenes.
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Filename=pic5d.jpg Filesize=89KB Dimensions=1024x586 Date added=Feb 26, 2010
Hosmer Mountain Reservoir The Hosmer Mountain Reservoir was an integral part of the city's water works. It is pictured here six years after completion in 1894, and provides a fascinating view of Willimantic before the forest reclaimed the hill.
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Filename=goodbyewilli-1.jpg Filesize=262KB Dimensions=1024x1034 Date added=Jun 24, 2011
Mourning the CityOn May 31, 1983, the evening before Willimantic (as a city) ceased to exist, mourners held a wake and processed up Main St. The consolidation culminated a 30 year effort to unite city and town and ended Willimantic's 150 year history as a separate political entity.
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Filename=pic3.jpg Filesize=102KB Dimensions=1024x675 Date added=Feb 26, 2010
Tinker Ted's Taxi ServiceThe summer of 1915, and Ted's convertible taxi has its top down. Fares? 10 cents one way within the city.
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Filename=pic2.jpg Filesize=95KB Dimensions=1024x570 Date added=Feb 26, 2010
Tinker Ted's Taxi ServiceWhen Ted Marrotte was 21, his father Arman Trudeau, a well known local grocer, loaned him the money to purchase the city's first taxi cab, and launch the first motorized jitney service. Here is Marrotte's business card.
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Filename=pic5.jpg Filesize=126KB Dimensions=1024x560 Date added=Feb 26, 2010
Tinker Ted's Taxi ServiceTed's children are pictured in his taxi, in the yard of his 100 High Street house. Note the hard rubber spare tire. Ted's children are pictured in his taxi, in the yard of his 100 High Street house. Note the hard rubber spare tire.
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Filename=pic6.jpg Filesize=145KB Dimensions=721x1024 Date added=Feb 26, 2010
Tinker Ted's Taxi ServiceThe Marrotte household at 100 High Street was demolished in 1949 because of building projects at the Willimantic State Teacher's College. Ted is pictured here laying a new drive in 1937. Note the old Willimantic Normal School in the background.
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Tinker Ted's Taxi ServiceThe Marrotte family purchased a summer home on Lake Coventry in the 1920s. Ice fishing was a favorite winter pastime. Marrotte (right) and his father-in-law Arman Trudeau dsiplay their catches, circa 1925.
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Filename=pic8.jpg Filesize=128KB Dimensions=1024x656 Date added=Feb 26, 2010
Tinker Ted's Taxi ServiceTed Marrotte's taxi service eneded in 1938 when he was hired as superintendent of the Willimantic water works. During World War two Marrotte worked at Pratt and Whitney. After the war he was employed as a plumber and handyman, and from 1954 until 1959, Marrotte established "Tinker Ted's tinshop" at Sturbridge Village, where he made vintage tin utensils using age-old methods. He is pictured here at his Sturbridge Village workshop in the mid 1950s.
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Filename=pic7w.jpg Filesize=101KB Dimensions=1024x555 Date added=Feb 26, 2010
Windham Center Green, 1911It all began here in the 1690s. This is Windham Center Green, pictured in 1911. The building visible at the far side of the green was built in 1839 for the Windham Bank. The organization relocated to the growing borough of Willimantic in 1872, and since then the building has been the home of the Windham Free Library. Also located on the green is a Sheriff's lock-up from the early 18th century -- along with some magnificent houses built before the Revolutionary War. This charming village also served as the summer home of Julian Alden Weir, the famed American impressionist artist.
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