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Filename=pic3.jpg Filesize=121KB Dimensions=1024x592 Date added=Feb 26, 2010
JumboWhen Barnum and Bailey's Circus brought Jumbo, the largest elephant in captivity, from England to the United States in the 1880s, it hit the national headlines. The Willimantic Linen Company soon jumped on the bandwagon and produced this card. It depicts Jumbo being dragged through the streets of New York City with unbreakable Willimantic cotton thread!
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Filename=pic4.jpg Filesize=138KB Dimensions=1024x693 Date added=Feb 26, 2010
Cute kidsCute kids are favored by advertisers today. It was no different a century ago! This card depicts three young girls becoming entangled in Willimantic cotton thread.
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Filename=pic5.jpg Filesize=125KB Dimensions=683x1024 Date added=Feb 26, 2010
Cute kids and animalsCute kids -- and cute animals are used to sell products, then and now. Although the dog in this 1885 winter scene is not that cute! Note the large spool of Willimantic cotton thread on the sleigh.
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Filename=pic1.jpg Filesize=127KB Dimensions=1024x627 Date added=Feb 26, 2010
PuckThe Willimantic Linen Company employed both popular and elite culture to advertise their products. This 1888 card depicts the mischievous Puck, from Shakespeare's Midsummer Night's Dream, wrapping not a girdle of silver thread around the earth, but a girdle of Willimantic cotton thread!
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Filename=pic2.jpg Filesize=175KB Dimensions=1024x715 Date added=Feb 26, 2010
Brooklyn BridgeThe Willimantic Linen Company were early pioneers in the production of color lithographic advertising cards. This card was published in 1883, and depicts the recently completed Brooklyn Bridge in New York City, constructed from Willimantic cotton thread, spools, bobbins, and thread packing cases. Note the juxtaposition of the largest mill in the world. The Linen Company's Mill Number Four, built in 1880, floats in the sky above the world's largest bridge.
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Filename=pic6.jpg Filesize=127KB Dimensions=663x1024 Date added=Feb 26, 2010
Willimantic Linen Company's Number Three MillThis 1910 postcard depicts the Willimantic Linen Company's Number Three Mill. It was erected in 1845 by the Wellesville Company on the site of Willimantic's first cotton mill built by Perez Richmond in 1822. The Wellesville mill became part of the Linen Company in 1876. It was demolished in the late 1920s, and stood on the city's Recreation Park. This idyllic view depicts the mill raceway and provides a somewhat over romantic view of industrialization, in a style known as "the factory in the garden."
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Filename=pic7.jpg Filesize=119KB Dimensions=1024x630 Date added=Feb 26, 2010
Welcome to WillimanticThis welcome to Willimantic card was one of a series of colorized postcards of the city produced in the late 1940s. Each letter of the city depicts another local scene published in the series.
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Filename=pic8.jpg Filesize=191KB Dimensions=1024x808 Date added=Feb 26, 2010
GulliverWhen first published in 1726, Jonathan Swift's book Gulliver's Travels caught the public's imagination and instantly became a best seller. The Willimantic Linen Company quickly exploited the book's popularity. This 1884 lithograph depicts the Lilliputians tying down Lemuel Gulliver with Willimantic's "best six cord spool cotton." The artists hired by the Willimantic Linen Company always ingeniously incorporated spools of cotton into the scenes.
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Filename=pow-historical-9a.jpg Filesize=866KB Dimensions=1728x1368 Date added=Jun 06, 2013
Valley Street (looking west from Church St.)The first building (partially visible) on the left was the Chaffee Mfg. Company which made braid. By 1950, Mayor Bergeron’s tin shop was there along with a liquor store. The next building was the Windham Silk Mill. By the 50s, it was William Brand. Then, on the corner of North and Valley, was the Washburn Block. Beyond the Washburn block, is a group of buildings housing the Willimantic Welfare Bureau (later home to Watson’s Movers), the Women’s Christian temperance Union, the Park Central Hotel, and Carpenter’s auto radiator repair. Just about visible to the left of the tree is the Turner Silk Mill, later the Trade School. June 6, 2013 Pic of the Week
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Filename=ephemstan-29tc.jpg Filesize=1007KB Dimensions=864x1054 Date added=Feb 11, 2013
T.W. Walker Company cardIn the late 1800s, Thomas W. and Mary E. Walker ran this store as well as the "Trader's Rebate Company" at 856 Main St. By 1903, George Walker operated the "Star Thirst Parlors" in the building. His motto - "Fluid delicacies of a superior quality deftly dispensed". (Photo courtesy of Stan)
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Filename=picm2.jpg Filesize=117KB Dimensions=1024x709 Date added=Feb 26, 2010
Turner Silk MillThe Turner Silk Mill, stood on the western corner of Bank St.and Valley St. It was built in 1888. The company went into liquidation in 1917, and was later used by the Willimantic Trade School. It was demolished in 1970.
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Filename=2-5-2015-pow-2.jpg Filesize=903KB Dimensions=1680x1266 Date added=Feb 12, 2015
Valley Street - looking west from Pearl Street -Pic of the Week February 5, 2015The building on the left was built in 1897 as Willimantic’s second armory. Later it became a dance hall and then home of Watson’s Movers. The next three buildings housed McCarthy Brothers Plumbing and Heating, then the Park Central Hotel, and J.B. Carpenter Plumbing. The Trade School can be seen on the far right.
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Filename=8-28-14pow.jpg Filesize=940KB Dimensions=1440x993 Date added=Aug 28, 2014
The Trade SchoolPictured here are the Electrical and Drafting Departments which were on the third floor of the old State Trade School on the corner of Bank and Valley Streets. Pic of the Week August 28 , 2014
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Filename=pow03-01-12.jpg Filesize=82KB Dimensions=1024x692 Date added=Mar 08, 2012
State Trade SchoolPic of the Week - March 1, 2012
This building started out as the Turner Silk Mill and later became, as the sign says, the State Trade School. It stood on the corner of Valley and Bank Streets.March 01, 2012 Pic of the Week - original photo
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Filename=November13.jpg Filesize=102KB Dimensions=1024x560 Date added=Nov 13, 2010
Vanderman's FoundryVanderman's Foundry on Mansfield Avenue. Years before he built the big plant on Mansfield Ave., Vanderman started out with a shop on Church St. and later moved it to Valley St. The inset in the illustration is the Valley St. building. His specialty was first-class plumbing and low pressure steam and hot water heating. By 1878 he was also manufacturing quite a number of his patent plumbing specialties and heavy steel tool chests used by railroads and construction trades. Some of the smaller chests were used by The Wells Fargo Express Co. and were used as boot-boxes on stage coaches.
 
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