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Filename=pic1.jpg Filesize=138KB Dimensions=1024x619 Date added=Feb 26, 2010
Tinker Ted's Taxi Service"Ted Marrotte (1894-1965) introduced Willimantic's first taxi, or jitney service in February 1915. Ted trained as a plumber, and gained a reputation of being somewhat of a mechanical genius, thus his name, "Tinker Ted." Ted is pictured here with that first taxi on Valley Street, Willimantic."
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Filename=Scan_Pic0006.jpg Filesize=371KB Dimensions=576x993 Date added=Apr 29, 2012
Northeast corner of Church and Valley StreetsWe are grateful to the copyright owner, "The Chronicle", for permission to use the above images and story from the May, 1992 anniversary edition of "The Chronicle". Further reproduction without permission is prohibited.
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Filename=Scan_Pic0002.jpg Filesize=569KB Dimensions=668x975 Date added=Apr 29, 2012
Church Street near Valley Street - 1873We are grateful to the copyright owner, "The Chronicle", for permission to use the above images and story from the May, 1992 anniversary edition of "The Chronicle". Further reproduction without permission is prohibited.
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Filename=1-7-2016-pow.jpg Filesize=309KB Dimensions=2047x1025 Date added=Jan 07, 2016
Pic of the Week January 7, 2015From the 1920s until the early 40s, marching bands and dance bands provided much of the music for all types of Willimantic events. The “Al-Pierre Tabarin” on Valley Street was one of Eastern Connecticut’s premier dance spots. Hal White had studied at the Boston Conservatory of Music and put this band together in the early 1930s. Local musicians included Kerman Lavigne (tenor sax), Clarence Sylvester (banjo), Bill and Ray Buckingham (trumpets), Roy Grover (drums),Lester Carter (piano), Rodney Clune (alto sax), and Hal White (violin and sax).
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Filename=laramee~0.jpg Filesize=944KB Dimensions=610x1008 Date added=Sep 30, 2015
Pierre J. (Pete) LarameePierre J. "Pete" Laramee served as the mayor of Willimantic in 1937 and from 1940 - 1941. He also served as the first person of French Canadian descent to represent Willimantic in the Connecticut State House of Representatives from 1917-1918, and 1923-1924 and as a Connecticut State Senator from 1937 to 1942. He was the owner of "The Laramee Company", a thriving meat market on North Street and was a partner in the "Al-Pierre Dance Hall" on Valley Street.

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Filename=April21.jpg Filesize=126KB Dimensions=1024x705 Date added=Apr 21, 2011
High and ValleyPaul Ashton identified this as, "the intersection of Valley and High with the steeple of the First Congregational church in the background (the one that blew down in the 1938 hurricane). It must have been shot from the Normal School building." To the left of the Congregational Church's steeple, one can make out one of St. Mary's steeples (they were modified in about 1958) and, to the left of that, very faintly, St. Joseph's pre-hurricane steeple.
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Filename=7-27-2017.jpg Filesize=71KB Dimensions=1024x731 Date added=Aug 03, 2017
Borodach's GroceryThe “Windham Market” was usually referred to as Borodach's Market. It began as a meat market and grew into a full grocery store. It was located on the corner of Valley and Jackson Streets and razed during thr redevelopment period.
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Filename=pow-historical-9a.jpg Filesize=866KB Dimensions=1728x1368 Date added=Jun 06, 2013
Valley Street (looking west from Church St.)The first building (partially visible) on the left was the Chaffee Mfg. Company which made braid. By 1950, Mayor Bergeron’s tin shop was there along with a liquor store. The next building was the Windham Silk Mill. By the 50s, it was William Brand. Then, on the corner of North and Valley, was the Washburn Block. Beyond the Washburn block, is a group of buildings housing the Willimantic Welfare Bureau (later home to Watson’s Movers), the Women’s Christian temperance Union, the Park Central Hotel, and Carpenter’s auto radiator repair. Just about visible to the left of the tree is the Turner Silk Mill, later the Trade School. June 6, 2013 Pic of the Week
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Filename=6-4-2015.jpg Filesize=353KB Dimensions=1924x1300 Date added=Jun 04, 2015
Willimantic's Redevelopment periodThis is the southwest corner of Valley and Jackson Streets. From the left, the storefronts were occupied in the 1960s by Superior Electronics and George Bourey’s “College Shop”. The building with “72” painted on it had an entrance on Valley Street and was home to Borodach’s Grocery Store. Joseph "Al" Beaulieu told us that, "the first building to the left was Samson Meat Market, then The College Shop, and Ame Bordack Meat Market, which caught fire on the second floor, we had one of our Fire Fighters go through the floor that night . I believe the building was owned by a Mrs Haddad."
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Filename=3-13-14pow.jpg Filesize=742KB Dimensions=1440x1299 Date added=Mar 13, 2014
West side of Church Street at the Valley Street intersectionThis is the west corner of Church and Valley streets in 1910. The building with the sign was the Willimantic Printing Company at 88 Church St. The next building was Chaffee Manufacturing. It produced nylon fishing line and braided silk). Across Valley Street was the west mill of Holland Manufacturing Pic of the Week March 13, 2014. Courtesy of Windham Historical Society.
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Filename=pic5m.jpg Filesize=80KB Dimensions=1024x590 Date added=Feb 26, 2010
Morrison Machine Company & Natchaug Silk CompanyThe Morrison Machine Company's factory is the wooden structure, and was located on Valley Street.
The Natchaug Silk Company's mills, built in 1888, stood on North Street. The Morrisons manufactured silk spinning machinery, and the Natchaug Company was famous for its high quality dress silk. The former company's mills were taken over by the Windham Silk Company in 1910. The latter company went into liquidation in 1895, due to a financial scandal. The Brand Company later used their mills in the 1950s.
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Filename=5-21-2015-a POW_.jpg Filesize=424KB Dimensions=1721x1355 Date added=May 21, 2015
Memorial Day, 1911 - first formations of the paradeCompany “L” of the Connecticut National Guard (first group of marchers in the photo) had marched from their Valley Street Armory down to Broad Street. At Broad Street they were joined by the Garde Florimond (second group of marchers) and the Tierney Cadets. They marched down Broad Street to Main and then up Main Street to the Town Hall. There, they were joined by twelve more groups. The parade proceeded to the Willimantic Cemetery where the graves of the veterans were decorated.
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Filename=4-6-2017.jpg Filesize=74KB Dimensions=884x431 Date added=Apr 13, 2017
Schoolhouse Lane Neighborhood.This was the Schoolhouse Lane vicinity. Notice that there were still houses on the south side of Valley Street between High and Windham streets, the rooftops of which are visible in the photo. There was no Post Office or Telephone Company building at that time.
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Filename=picm2.jpg Filesize=117KB Dimensions=1024x709 Date added=Feb 26, 2010
Turner Silk MillThe Turner Silk Mill, stood on the western corner of Bank St.and Valley St. It was built in 1888. The company went into liquidation in 1917, and was later used by the Willimantic Trade School. It was demolished in 1970.
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Filename=Hope Valley Band-Ralph Cabit.jpg Filesize=75KB Dimensions=1024x465 Date added=Jun 22, 2010
Hope Valley BandThis is a photo of the Hope Valley Band playing in March, 1970 at Purple Heart, a social center in Willimantic. From left to right, Ralph Cabit-guitar , Dick Theriault-singer, John Boudreau-drums, Dave Dinse-guitar, Ray Macht-bass. Photo courtesy of Ralph Cabit. If any of our visitors has a picture of early local bands, please let us know so that we can post them here.
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Filename=ephemstan-22tc.jpg Filesize=702KB Dimensions=1077x1800 Date added=Feb 11, 2013
Willimantic High School Graduation ExercisesPrior to the opening of Windham High School in 1897, Willimantic had two high schools. The District One High School (Willimantic High School) which was at the southeast corner of Windham and Valley Streets), and Natchaug High School. (Photo courtesy of Stan)
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